(PA2 ) Bio-Normalizer Modulates Free Radicals in Brain, Blood and Macrophage

Title Bio-Normalizer Modulates Free Radicals in Brain, Blood and Macrophage
Year 1994
Author J. A. Osato; L.G. Korkina; L.A. Santiago; I.B. Afanas’ev; K.Horistu; A. Mori
Publisher 7th Biennial Scientific Meeting

 


 

SPONSORS

The Organising Committee thanks the following organisations and acknowledges their commitment to continuing education, research and the well-being of the community.


The Heart Research Institute,

Sydney Astra Hassle AB

Bioxytech SA

Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co Limited

Qantas Airways Limited

AIDAB

The Australian Tourist Commission

Blackmores Limited

Free Radical Sciences, Inc

Goodman Fielder Limited

Henkel Australia Pty Limited

International Science Foundation

Malaysian Palm Oil Promotion Council

Nikken Foods Company Ltd

Roche Vitamins & Fine Chemicals

Astra Pharmaceuticals

Beckman Instruments

Randox Laboratories Ltd

Alaris America

AMRAD Corporation

National Heart Foundation of Australia

Smoking and Health Research Foundation of Australia

Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Inc

SFRR (Australasia)

Betatene Limited

DITARD

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Front cover Sydney Opera House photography by Don McMurdo,

courtesy of the Sydney Opera House

Front cover Aboriginal painting “Witchetty Grub Dreaming 1991″

by Paddy Japalijarri Sims

Inside back cover map courtesy of Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre

Back cover photographs from the Australian Tourist Commission

 

WELCOME TO ISFRR ’94

 On behalf of the International Society for Free Radical Research and the Organizing Committee of the 7th Biennial Scientific Meeting of the Society, we welcome you to Sydney and this conference.

We believe you will find the scientific programme stimulating and provocative, unusual in places, and of the highest quality. We look forward to the mutual exchanges which will result and hope you enjoy the programme.

We are grateful for the corporate support we have received and acknowledge the importance of such participation to the overall success of ISFRR ’94 and give special thanks to our sponsors for their commitment.

We welcome you and thank you for your participation and contribution to the success of ISFRR ’94.

Roger Dean


Chairman, ISFRR ’94

Heart Research Institute

145 Missenden Road Camperdown, Sydney NSW 2050 Australia

gold card sponsor of the conference

ISFRR ’94 ORGANISING COMMITTEE

Sydney Free Radical Group, Inc

Chairma

Roger Dean, Director 

Heart Research Institute, Sydney

Secretary & Scientific Programme

Roland Stocker, Group Leader

Heart Research Institute, Sydney

Treasurer

Peter Southwell-Keely, Associate Professor

Department of Organic Chemistry

University of New South Wales
Vice-Chairperson

Dana Jamieson, Associate Professor

School of Physiology & Pharmacology

University of New South Wales


ISFRR ’94 SUB-COMMITTEE

Publicity and Promotion 

Wendy Jessup, Group Leader

Heart Research Institute, Sydney

Social

Lorraine Assenza  Heart Research Institute, Sydney

Sponsorship

David Sullivan  Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney

Sub-Committee Members include

Mark Baker Phil Bone  Jan Gebicki  Sylvia Gebicki  John Hodder  Nick Hunt

Michael Perry  Jeremy Simpson  Jane Taylor  Christine Winterbourn

 

CONFERENCE ORGANISER

Margaret Blackwell

Abacus Management Pty Limited

SFRR INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE

President 

 Irwin Fridovich                         

President Elect

 Robin Willson 

Secretary-General 

Lester Packer  

Treasurer

Clemens von Sonntag

Representatives

Kelvin Davies
Oxygen Society

Roger Dean
SFRR Australasia

Bruce Freeman
Oxygen Society

Masayasu Inoue
SFRRAsia 

Hiroe Nakazawa
SFRR Asia

Sten Orrenius
SFRR Europe 

Guiseppe Poli
SFRR Europe

Christine Winterbourn
SFRR Australasia

Secretaries

John E Biaglow
The Oxygen Society
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  Department
of Radiation Oncology  122 Levy Oral Health Building  4010 Locust  Philadelphia, \
PA 19104-6002  U.S.A.

Victor Darley-Usmar
SFRR Europe
Biochemical Sciences  The Wellcome Research Laboratories  Langley Court
Beckenham Kent BR3 3BS United Kingdom

Wendy Jessup
SFRR Australasia
Heart Research Institute    145 Missenden Road   Camperdown  Sydney,
NSW 2050  Australia

Toshikazu Yoshikawa
SFRR Asia
Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine  First Department of Medicine                                                        Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602  Japan

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMME

PL. A   Radicals and Life Style                                                                                       Bruce Ames

PL.D    Antioxidant Drug Targeting
Anthony Allison

PL.E     Free Radicals and Metal Catalysis
Shosuke Kawanishi

PL.H      Myocardial and Other Ischaemia and/or Reperfusion
David Hearse

PL.I      Oxidative Reactions and Heme Proteins
Paul Ortiz de Montellano

PL.K    Reactive Nitrogen Intermediates
Joseph Beckman

PL.M    Particles and Pollutants
Brooke Mossman

PL.N    DNA and Radicals
Sten Steenken

PL.R    Free Radical Cytotoxicity
Christine Winterboum

PL.T     Disorders of the CNS and Ageing
Robert Floyd

Conference Dinner Speech

Free Radical Mechanisms in Tissue Injury
Mario Dianzani

Sub-Plenary Session (SP)

SP.A      Radicals and Life Style                                                                              Lester Packer

SP.B     Redox-active Protein and Carbohydrate Components
John Baynes

SP.C       Radical and Antioxidant Reactions in Multi-Phase Systems
Keith Ingold

SP.D      Antioxidant Drug Targeting                                                                       John Eaton

SP.E       Free Radicals and Metal Catalysis
to be announced

SP.F       Oxidation and Antioxidation in Food                                                        Karen Schaich

SP.G      Radicals/Oxidants and Arachidonic Acid Metabolism
Alvin Chan

SP.H      Myocardial and Other Ischaemia and/or Reperfusion
Gregory Bulkley

SP.I        Oxidative Reactions and Heme Proteins                                                  Tony Kettle

SP.J        Enzymatic Defences against Oxidative Damage                                      Stefan Marklund

SP.K    Reactive Nitrogen Intermediates
Brad McDonald

SP.L       Atherosclerosis                                                                                          Wendy Jessup

SP.M      Particles and Pollutants                                                                              Ann Aust

SP.O      Oxidative Events in Proliferation and Replication
Nicholas Hunt

SP.N      DNA and Radicals                                                                                     Nancy Oleinick

SP.P       Inflammation                                                                                             Masayasu Inoue

SP.Q      Spin Traps in Biomedicine
Michael Davies

SP.S       Oxidants and Gene Expression                                                                  Rex Tyrrell

SP.R     Free Radical Cytotoxicity
Sten Orrenius

SP.T     Disorders of the CNS and Ageing
Richard Cutler

Daiichi Lunch Session/Ebselen      

01          Ebselen Transport and its LDL-Cholesterylester  Hydroperoxide
Reducing Activity in Plasma
Helmut Sies

02          Inhibition of Oxidative Modification of LDL by Ebselen
Etsuo Niki

03         Status of Ebselen Development in Stroke                                      TakaoAsano

F/G 7 DISTRIBUTION AND BILIARY EXCRETION OF
NATURAL AND UNNATURAL α -TOCOPHEROLS

Ichikawa H, Tadahiko U, Kiyose C, Igarashi 0

Tokyo Mtr. R/Lab. Pub. Health Tokyo, Japan Ochanomizu University, Tokyo. Japan

 

The present study was designed to investigate the biodiscrimination between natural and unnatural form of α- Tocopherol ( α - Toc) by feeding non-labeled 2-ambo-α-Toe Ac(equimolar mixture of RRR- (natural) and SRR-α-Toc Acs (unnatural)), which have no – possibility of hydrogen exchange and isotopic effects, to male rats.

The animals (F344/DuCrj, at the 4th week after birth) were fed diets containing 100 mg of 2 – ambo-α-Toc Ac/kg diet for 8 weeks. Amounts of α-Tocs in blood, tissues and bile were determined by newly developed HPLC method.

There were evident differences between the amounts of RRR- and SRR-α-Tocs in blood, tissues and bile. The amounts of SRR were 8.1% (plasma), non-detectable (ND, RBC), less than 15.7% (liver, or less (the others)). Besides, it was especially noted that the amounts of SRR in brain were ND.

And the excretion of RRR in bile was higher than that of SRR, and the amount of absorption of SRR via portal vein was very small.

F/G 9 BIO-NORMALIZER MODULATES FREE RADICALS
IN BRAIN, BLOOD AND MACROPHAGE 

Osato JA1,2, Afanas’ev IB3, Korkina LG4, Santiago LA1,5, Horitsu H2 and Mori A5


1Osato Research Institute, Gifu, Japan; 2The United Graduate Sch. of Agricultural Science, Gifu University, Gifu, Japan; 3Vitamin E Research Institute, Moscow, Russia;4Russian Institute for Pediatric Hematology, Moscow, Russia; and 5Department of Neuroscience, Okayama University Medical School, Okayama, Japan

 

To provide for the scientific basis of the purported therapeutic and preventive actions of Bio-normalizer (BN), a fermented functional health food from papaya, we studied by electron spin resonance/spin trapping and chemiluminescence (CL) methods its effects on the free radical production in different systems. BN inhibited hydroxyl, peroxyl, carbon-centered, and lipid peroxides in various rat brain regions; suppressed oxygen radicals

in cell -free systems such as Fenton reaction, xanthine oxidase, H202 + NaCIO, H202 + horseradish peroxidase; reduced spontaneous and menadione induced superoxide release from human erythrocytes; decreased luminol-amplified CL but increased lucigeno-independent CL; and enhanced superoxide dismutase activity in inflammed murine macrophage. While BN prevented the formation of hyliroxyl and peroxyl radicals, it induced the production of intracellular superoxide radical by dormant and activated phagocytes, human neutrophils, and rat peritoneal macrophage.

 

THE EFFECTS OF α- AND δ -TOCOPHEROLS ON
F/G8  
LIPID PEROXIDE                                                                                    FORMATION IN RAT TISSUES

Hirahara F. and Kimura S*.

Division of Food Sience, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Graduate School of Nutrition, Showa

Women’s University*, Tokyo, Japan

 

Much work has been done to examine the antioxidant effects of tocopherol (toc) homologues in vitro. The present study was undertaken on the effects of α- or Ȣ – toc on lipid peroxide (LPO) formation in rat tissues. Hale Wistar strain rats 3 weeks old were acclimatized to a control diet for one week, and they were divided into 3 groups of six rats each. Group 1 was fed a vitamin E deficient diet; groups 2 and 3 were fed 100g of vitamin

E-deficient diet supplemented with 10mg of  - or Ȣ – toc, respectively. Al l groups of rats were maintained on these diets for 3 weeks. The toe levels of serum and of tissues were determined by HPLC method. LPO values in the rat tissues were compared by the TBA and Chemiluminecence (CL) methods. α Toc was widely distributed in rat t issues. A Ȣ-Toc content equal to that of the α-toc group was admitted into the adipose tissues, but trace amounts of Ȣ-toc in group 3 were admitted into other tissues. In group 3, LPO values (TBARS) of tissues were lower than in group I, but even the adipose tissues containing Ȣ-toc were much higher values than those of group 2.

Although only small amounts of Ȣ-toc was contained, in the testes and brain the low LPO values were admitted.

The LPO values (CLvalues) of the liver and testes in group were 2 >>3 > 1

BIO-NORMALIZERMODULATES FREE RADICALS IN BRAIN, BLOOD AND MACROPHAGE

OsatoJA1 2, Afanas‘ev IB3- Korkina LG4, Santiago LA1 5, Horitsu H22 andMoriA5

1Osato Research Institute

2The United Graduate Sch. of Agricultural Science, Gifu University

3Vitamin Research Institute, Moscow, Russia

4Russian Institute for Pediatric Hematology, Moscow, Russia

5Department of Neuroscience, Okayama University Medical School Okayama

Journal of Free Radicals in Biology & Medicine Volume 2 Number 3 (F/G9):1994

To provide for the scientific basis of the purported therapeutic and preventive actions of Bio-normalizer (BN), a fermented functional health food from papaya, we studied by electron spin resonance/spin trapping and chemiluminescence (CL) methods its effects on the free radical production in different systems. BN inhibited hydroxyl, peroxyl, carbon-centered, and lipid peroxides in various rat brain regions; suppressed oxygen radicals in cell-free systems such as Fenton reaction, xanthine-xanthine oxidase, H2O2+NaClO, H2O2+horseradish peroxidase; reduced spontaneous and menadione-induced superoxide release from human erythrocytes; decreased luminol-amplified CL but increased lucigenin-dependent CL; and enhanced superoxide dismutase activity in inflamed murine macrophage. While BN prevented the formation of hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals, it induced the production of intracellular superoxide radical by dormant and activated phagocytes, human neutrophils, and rat peritoneal macrophage.